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income students who were pursuing a higher education was less than half of today. we'll cut the gap between lower and upper income students. making agrant is livesence to millions of has been discussed in reference to access. pell grant recipients have less than this. after you add scholarship aid or what ever they are expected to -- out of your park it pocket, he still has $11,000 to pay for one year of higher education. their feeling that with loans, additional work, eating ramen noodles. the students are living on the edge. if you do not cut pell grant funding, the students in the range, you run two major risks. some will not pursue higher education. are a number of students are academically prepared to go to four-year institutions while under much down to two-year areitutions where they substantially less likely to complete. in doing with the long-term i think this is appropriate and targeted spending reductions in areas that are not linked to needy students are directly. and pursues a ribbon. i have listed a host of offset options in my testimony. i will just throw out one with
mandela died thursday. he was 95. coming up on c-span2, a hearing on higher education affordability. then senate judiciary committee chairman talks about human rights. and later an update on veterans disability claims. >>> a house panel investigation cost of higher education and the use of pell grants. we'll hear from student financial aid and higher education officials. this education and work force training subcommittee hearing is two hours. [inaudible conversations] the subcommittee will come to order. good morning. thank you for joining us for our hearing on pell grant program. we have an excellent panel of witnesses here this morning. we look toward to their testimony. this hearing is the 11th in the series designed to gain a more complete understanding of the challenges facing post secondary students and institutions. the hearings held to inform the committee of policy changes that should be considered as part of the upcoming reauthorization of the higher education act. we abbreviate hea. over the last year the hearings provide a forum to discuss opportunities to encourage inn
of the american federation of teachers, spoke about the report. she spoke about the efforts to improve education. hosted by the christian science monitor. this is just over one hour. >> our guest is randi weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. this is her first visit with the group. she got an early look at the joys of helping children learn since her mother was a teacher. she earned degrees from cornell university and a law degree from cardozo school of law. she worked at a wall street law firm for several years. she taught history in brooklyn while serving as counsel for the president of the united federation of teachers. she served as president for 12 years before her election as aft president in 2008. that ends the biographical portion of the program. as always, we are on the record here. please no live blogging or tweeting or other means of filing well this is underway. there is no embargo on the breakfast. our friends at c-span have agreed not to air video of the session until one hour after the breakfast is over to give reporters time to file. give me a nonthreateni
people have posted on my facebook page. i hear you support common core education standards. i'll nev watch your show again. another said, if you support common core, you have hoes -- you've lost my trust. another one, you need to learn the truth about common core. the person who said he never would wah my show again won't hear this and that's too bad. i want to cut to the chase itch don't support what common core has become in many states or school districts. i'm dead set against the federal government creating a uniform curriculum for any subject. i oppose the collectio of personal data on students that would identify them and then track them, and certainly any effort to give that personal information to the federal government. i am steadfast in my belief that parents, parents, should ultimately decide. the best for their children's education, whether it's public schools, private schools, religious schools, or home schools. i believe education is a local or state function, not a federal one. sadly, the very label, common core, has come to be associated with things i detest, like age
powerful military, but the best education system? not so much. the survey compares thousands of reports from around the world. u.s. students are average in reading and science, below average in math. the u.s. came in 36 out of 65 developed countries between the slovak republican and lithuania. students in shanghai are more than two years ahead of the peers in massachusetts. the u.s. did better in reading, 24th in the world rankings. number one, shanghai again. science, the u.s. came in number 28 on that list. the top performer? you guessed it. shanghai, china. the u.s. will not get the most improved award. the u.s. fell in all three subjects from 2009 to 2012. u.s. education secretary arne duncan says it points a picture of education stagnation. is the u.s. falling behind or is everyone else getting better? i sat down with candy crowley and christiane amanpour and asked why the u.s. is falling behind. >> what is the problem with education? we keep throwing money at it. the interesting statistics are that the u.s. spends a huge amount of money on education, it doesn't spend as much as ot
in the evolution of education? our camps and programs like it the wave of the future? >> it is part of the future. the biggest key as that this country has a fascination with higher education, which is great. at the same time, we seem to be hypnotized with the idea or the myth that college and higher education are the same thing. i think we should scale back that idea. college is part of higher education. but there are other things we can do to get people educated and into the workplace that doesn't depend on a four year degree. i think part of this is a mental shift, shifting away from college being the solution to that being part of the solution of a much wider range of educational opportunities that people have. we are not trained to recognize those. >> do you think this country is doing a disservice to potential employees and potential members of the workforce i not making that distinction between college and higher education? >> absolutely. i don't think it is poorly intentioned. i think it has been decades that we got of college of higher education. but if you look at germany, where the une
firm belief that education held the key to helping south africans. tÑ >> well back to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. here are today's headlines. lawmakers are due back in washington. they'll be facing pressing matters before they head out for the holidays. the most significant issue is the budget to avoid the government shutdown like the one in october. >>> four leaders are making their way to pay tribute to nelson mandela. president obama and first lady are taking off on air force one. >>> french forces are now the central africa republic say they will restore order by answer means necessary. the. >>> 37 years after students in soweto protests over the education system, south african students still fail to make the grade. it seems that apartheid is still hard to overcome. we have more from cape town. [ cheering ] nelson mandela supporting and encouraging children in school. from the start of his career as an ain't apartheid activist, the leader placed education at the center of the struggle. he said his single most important priority is >> later because of this and in some
. all of the money, all of the education, all of the business opportunity went to a very very small minority, and if you want to equal that out, it is going to cost, and it is going to hurt. all of those school children that left to protest, and then you saw the massacre. they shot children in the back. those children gave up their education, and it works. it was that global pressure to end apartheid, that led to it. and those very children wanted jobs in the new south africa. and they couldn't get them, because in the end, it was now -- it is now about education. so that's the problem that south africa had. they had brought them to the promise land. that's what with the country still sufficient errs from. >> 76. >> right. >> and remember at the time, the world was getting onboard with the let's do something about south africa, but the problems with ever this the wrights and great britain. ronald ragan and margaret thatcher were really the most resistence to imposing sanctions. we're saying to the president at the time, we have to do something. >> and they wouldn't. >> yes. >> and t
. they will pour resources into helping to improve the education of every child growing up in their native land. mandela greatly valued education. he once said education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. >> education was just very, very important to my grandfather. education is one of his things that he's so passionate about. every single one our family was educated. because he said when you're educated nobody else can take it away from you. >> for their support, for their love, for their dedication towards my father and the family. to thank them for their prayers and comfort during this difficult time. >> our thanks to the mandela family for sharing their father with the world. in the words of else in mandela, for to be free is not nearly to cast off ones chains but to live in a way that enhances the freedom of others. his daughter says he achieved that through the practice of peace and reconciliation. >> thank you, kelly. there are some new concerns over so-called energy drinks. accord to a brand-new study, those beverages can pose a serious risk to your heart
forces last month. bernard smith has more from cairo. >> former center of islamic education in egypt has been one of the focal points for people, students protesting the coup that deposed mohamed morsi back in september. there's fighting still ongoing despite the arrests, between students and security forces all day. in fact it seems to have stepped up over the past few days, protests pretty much all the time but yesterday we had a group of women students just outside the university beaten up by local residents and by security forces, we are told. earlier last month we had 21 students facing trial for previous protests at al assad university and we have another 12 students who have been jailed for 17 years for protesting again at that same university. so a considerable crack down by the security forces against the students and at al assad university and they are continuing to protest and they seem to be gathering in intensity. >> thailand will hold its parliamentary plekses o election january 2nd, after yin luck shinawatra has, run the country. wayne hay reports from bangkok. >> the lead
because she lacks a decent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own. that should offend all of us. and it should compel us to action. we are a better country than this. >> i mean, when we get to the point where children in no fault of their own are living in these situations and it's just discarded, that's troubling about the spirit of the country and those that are in government, congressman. >> well, a nation that wants to consider itself respectful and decent ought to want to have its citizens live a respectful and decent life. and to do so you've got to pay people a decent wage. we've got to raise the wage from $7.25 to $9. just think about this. in 1938 fdr was successful in getting the minimum wage raised. and from 1938 to 2013 it's raised only $7. they are having difficulty surviving. this nation is not a mean spirited nation. and the majority of the people, i think, go along with what we're saying. the problem is it will never be brought up to a vote here in the house of representatives. >> when the congressman says this is not a mean spirited
. to lincoln university, which educate add lot of south african exiles. and that was their purpose. to get educated. my tag came here with the pup of becoming a political journalist. and he was not able to get -- maybe he would have been hired. but he was not hired by anyone and eventually ended up working for the united nations at the apartheid division in the antiapartheid radio. and he had three degrees. a bachelors and two masters. one in library studies and one in communications. it was -- he died right -- his death coincides with my going to south africa for his funeral, and it was then that i realized that i was walking in his well, thomas, i am interested what did you learn in in the making of the film, and the, cans what were the things that you learned in those conversations that will never leave you? >> the persistence of vision. that even when things look the most dire, that justice can win out. that i want to come back british prime minister is speaking now. a man who suffered so much for freedom and justice, and a man who flu his dignity and triumph inspired millions. the str
the novel by the evening. something to that that was posted on an education over the top end of the catholic media. the store was opened on the computers and smash it. science labs reports said. i never write about it often at least we had this to austin on monday it's been ages i mean by that time the campus of us and some spoons allegedly belonging to an al qaeda and eight. the best of from the university hostel in september he was in it. most of the seventeen soccer world cup in twenty seventeen the chief executives' committee which met in the business at the outside but about half as the vaunted that this gene is dominant and yet had the odd it was because of azerbaijan and south africa. it may be the biggest soccer thought of it it gets posted the president said dr said this was of enormous importance for the time to bond point two billion people in sporting political and geopolitical tabs. this is the site. this is book be a big weekend for i need to thank the chief executives' committee but keeping the cross hamas and bombed in depth the bikes who was presenting on the same woke up fr
their families. it is not easy for roma children in the czech education system. it is not just because their parents don't always look after them properly according to this person. she tells me the state must do more to promote and to ration. -- must do more to promote integration. recently, check education authorities asked them to count the roma children. they want us to judge which children were roma and which were not on the basis of their physical appearance. i did not react and have not heard anything since then. education authorities put this scheme on ice because of the criticism it received from many teachers. one year ago, the police started a pilot project. like these people are being trained as special police officers in an attempt to combat rising crime. -- they someone's been y's ombudsman helped initiate the project. he believes there will be less friction of the crime rate among the roma false. we want to diffuse the hatred. the roma police officers are helping us. they should get close to the people in their community and help implement law and order. the idea gives th
held at night, they were trying to educate us to begin to understand why the boycott, why the situation, why the uprising. >> he understood as nelson mandela did the urgent need to educate black students to the standards of their white counterparts to give them both purpose and hope. >> the truth is the anc is la really struggled to fulfill nelson mandela's idealistic vision, school buildings are falling apart and crowding is rife. schools ton bleak cape flat south side cape town is more symbolistic of the system struggling with. activists argued there is a dangerous gap between promise of education and what it actually delivers. schools boast a 70% pass rate. but to graduate students only need 30% on their exams. a third of them won't be literate by the time they leave. >> and the end of the study about 50% of those young people have fallen out of the system. so it also has to do with the curriculum, it has -- also has to do with the kind of training that our teachers had during end today. >> so schools are still struggling with the legacy of apartheid, its burden stubbornly persistent
. the education system is riddled with problems. and you also see that there is an increasing public corruption. so the current president has been involved in a huge scandal involving his private home. so people look to nelson mandela and think theres with a leader. there was someone with real integrity. so i think that this is a moment for people to look back and reflect on where they've come from and how to get back on the right path. >> woodruff: and also by definition losing what i think you call the moral center for the country. >> well, i think for many people nelson pan della does represent a kind of moral center. and a choice to turn away from violence, to turn away from strife. and to turn away from racial divisions. and instead of standing in judgement of one another, to reconcile and to admit that we did terrible things to each other. but now we're ready to move on. and i think that was the great gift of nelson mandela. that he was able to bring people together in a way that made them feel that they could forgive and made them move on. >> woodruff: lydia, one other thing. you wrote t
dig in those numbers those people who have higher education despite the cost and debt they incur, they do much better. >> that's correct. even in this recession, their unemployment rate stayed half that of high school graduates. but what happened in this report was that over the last three months you do look, and you get a good result that college graduates with a bachelor's degree or more, they did much better over the last three months suggesting we may be seeing some acceleration, some improvement. >> as you go left. on the right you have some college. on the left, high school dropouts have the highest unemployment rate. >> that's right. your rung on the ladder depends on your skills, age, race, ethnicity, where you live, and high school drop outs in this information-based economy, they're the least skilled. what jumped out at me when i looked at this, yeah, compared to last month the college grads did much better. >> but they have half of the unemployment rate of the national average 3.4% compared to 7%. >> that's been a longstanding that college grads have. but you see the y
educate. he was the most educated candidate they ever had to try to move voters to a new place. >> you mentioned the learning. and gay mcdougall, you campaigned to release him from prison. he used the time in prison to be educated as well. >> absolutely. he used it to be educated and educated the other prisoners. he called it the university of robben island. they spent time learning about political development around the world. they decided who they, as a political party and as, you know, activists, wanted to be. the decisionmaking. when they finally emerged, from that prison, they knew exactly the road they wanted to travel. >> and jendayi frazer, he was conscious of his role as educator when he became president and after he left office as well. didn't often hide disappointment in what was going on in south africa and other african nations. >> yes, he certainly was. i think president mandela, what i took from him was the courage of his convictions. he was very clear when he did not agree. he would do that privately and publicly. for instance, on the issue of hiv and aids, he certainly
highlighting the fact that a lot of this job growth, good jobs, manufacturing, education, construction. so they say that those are signs that the economy is moving in the right direction. at the same time, as you point out, the white house looking at those numbers and using them to argue that unemployment insurance should be extended for 1.3 million americans. they point out that within those economic figures you can see 4 million americans have been unemployed for six months or more. here's what president obama had to say in his weekly address. take a listen. >> for many families it can be the difference between hardship and catastrophe. it makes a difference for a mother who suddenly doesn't know if she will be able to put food on the table for his kids or a father who lost his job and is looking for a new one. last year it ended 2.5 people out of poverty and cushioned the blow for many more. >> now, alex, republicans are making the opposite argument. they are saying that the low unemployment rate or relatively low unemployment rate speaks to the fact that the economy doesn't need more s
on education and other schools are falling apart. throwing money is not the answer. we have to allow them to north innovate. we must end corporate welfare and crony capitalism. we must encourage policies that will lift up the individual. allow creation for new jobs and improve the schools. can't be a bailout though. it won't work. it would lead us further down a path of dependency. more jobs are only one part of the solution though. i believe we must also show that we can build on a government that values our god given rights of all americans. in addition economic freedom, we have to have a 21st century civil rights agenda with education, choice, voting rights and prison reform. no one life should be ruined because of a youthful mistake. no one should be thrown in prison for years and decades when they haven't hurt anyone but themselves. no one should lose their voting rights because they spent time in prison. it does us no good to create jobs for young people in detroit if they can't later get such jobs because of out of control war on drugs. they should be able to vote and have a life a
in 1990. jean elle has the impact in the world of education and sports. we begin with the worldwide tribute happening as we speak. as dawn broke, the celebration in south africa continues, the nation lovingly remembering the man. president obama said mandela's journey from prisoner to president, taught him the power of hope. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> reporter: mandela was born in south africa's black elite. but he led the movement against apartheid and was thrown in jail. tonight, south africans remember. >> our thoughts are with the millions of people across the world who embrace him as their own. >> reporter: when nelson mandela walked free after 27 years, he won the presidency, calling for racial reconciliation. and he made it work. no retribution. no trials. just forgiveness and an example to all. the world embraced nelson mandela. the u.s. congress gave him highest honors. tonight, the white house's flag is at half-staff. and this sign is up at the apollo theater.
education up to high school student film for funding thanks to you. about sixty per cent of all high school students. for other reasons they knew well. see north korea. i do not want to be useful to do it in the future through education. in teaching school commitments t stands. you can't beat them he's trying to preach there are pros and acorn people more people. it is for a lesser of two wee ones. to make his team come the new plant in it to him. oh. in an eye. the us unemployment rate in november hit the lowest level in five years more jobs were created in the american labor market than expected investors around the world have been waiting for these figures to get cues about when the federal reserve code to scale down its massive bond buying program. u s labor department official said unemployment was seven percent in november. that's down zero point three percentage points from that over. employers added two under three thousand jobs in the non farm sector that's three thousand more than october. the us central bank is likely to take the numbers into account that their policy meeting in
the battles over bilingual education, the idea that we should be dealing with each other in two languages. well, i've just been spending a ton of time in a place where i only speak one of 11 official languages, right? so you go to a place, there's a wonderful place if newtown -- in newtown, this part of johannesburg that kind of helps represent this hybridizing, modernizing, cultural place, a kind of african cosmopolitan place. it's a cafÉ where people come and do spoken word, sort of like louder than a bomb. except in five or six or seven languages. and, you know, you'll walk in there and somebody will begin a poem and then lapse into english. have a little zulu, go into afrikan and somehow that entire group of 300 people gets enough of the gist of what's going on to have the experience of that kind of cross-cultural exchange ing. that means people who grew up speaking 11 different languages are in the room together and having one conversation. so i think there's a ton that we have to learn about that. i think even though it will sound odd to say, i think we have a ton to learn about ho
back to your basic things, individual's abilities to aspire to their fullest potential. education is a major part of it. th is not obviously available to the extent it should be to help people overme the other limitationons. there are so many stctural problems that have to be addressed. we do not even get close to that with this spee. >> charles, according to a polling,g, most americans beliee the rich are geing cher, the poor arere getting poorer. 92% of democrats believe that. 50% of americans. it does s not help the republicans' image. talking about tting food stamps. >> i think the polls are right and obama has been over that gap. the memedian house hold come was $56,000. is $5252,500. there has been a drop in median income. while the rich have watched their stocks double since the day obama came into offe. on the one hand he has a fed pumping up, inflating the pricinof housing and ststock, deliberately by prting a trillion dollars a y year of money. and on the other hand we have a drdrop, and this is unprececede, a drop in the recovery. this has been going on -- >> excuse me.
on and you think about the key things in our economy that someone has to do to raise a family -- education, healthcare -- these are the most inhat have gone up price meanwhile wages have been flat over the last 12, 13 years, real wages have been flat and insecurity is growing. you mentioned detroit -- time,ns for the first public pensions are on the chopping block in this bankruptcy which have implications for other cities that are stressed fiscally so working people are in a moment here that they haven't time.n in a long gwen: is there a disconnect, david, between what michael is talking about in cities like detroit and at mcdonald's restaurants around the country and what we're seeing in the economically? >> i don't think so. i think the tide is rising, but michael's absolutely right that more and more of the goodies are going to people at the top. blankfine, the c.e.o. of goldman sachs, did an interview with "fortune magazine" and he good at country is very creating wealth but not very good at distributing it and i pickinge president was up on something and you can see municipalities ra
. >> pelley: nelson mandela once said education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world. jim axelrod found that message changed the hearts of some american students. >> reporter: when nelson mandela visited madison park high school in roxbury, massachusetts, in 1990 the crowd went wild. eager to hear his words of wisdom. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. >> reporter: a 16-year-old sophomore in the gymnasium that day. >> the youth of today are the leaders of tomorrow. and at the time that was one of the things that really stuck to my head. so this day i try to instill the same concept in my students. >> reporter: mandela's speech was a turning point in dipina's young life. he decided he too wanted to lead from the classroom as a teacher. >> okay. the word freedom, but freedom is not free. >> reporter: now he's a history teacher at brighton high school in boston, hoping to a model in a school where more than one in ten students drop out. born to poor immigrant parents in the west african nation of cape verde, dipina knows well the barriers to a child's suc
to continue his education at florida state. >>> and in the nfl, two teams moving in different directions meet on thursday night. jacksonville, winners in three of their last four games, hosting houston, losers of ten straight. the jaguars used some trickery. ace sanders catching a lateral pass and throws it to jordan todman for a third quarter touchdown. the jags win, 27-20. >>> finally, nelson mandela once said sport has the power to change the world. as a young man, the human rights leader was an accomplished amateur boxer. a year after his historic election as south africa's first president was credited with bringing his nation together at the world cup final which south africa won. he got to host the2010 world cup. the first time that tournament was ever held in africa. and he was known for inspiring athletes across generations. boxing legend muhammad ali had this to say about mandela. he was a man whose heart, soul, and spirit could not be contained or restrained by racial and economic injustices, metal bars, or the burden of hate and revenge. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs
and that education is something that is available to all that we walk towards more pros spert pore young people in the country. when president obama was here a few short months ago, he talked about the ways it has the potential to be an after our strengths are linked to one another. i think that's the best way to memorialize all that he meant to us. >> we know december 15th is when will be the final good-bye, if that's appropriate to say, we'll see each other again, but the final good-bye here. i can't imagine there won't be a television set or radio on where people will gather and watch this moment that will be unmatched as far as the diversity and the range of people who sincerely say that this man changed their life, set the compass of their direction in life. >> that's so true, tamron. during the anti-apartheid moment, we used to chant all the time, the whole world is watching, here again he has made certain that the world world is watching, everyone is pausing and reflecting on what this man meant to us all. we count ourselves blessed to have lived in the shadow of his grace all of these y
poetry. he wanted what he called a western-style education. i think that stays with me. especially in this holiday season, we forget what we have. a western-style education. this guy was willing to do anything for it. and rebel against his parents. what he wanted more than anything else. he didn't even see that he was going to become this worldwide legend. >> dana be an bob both have questions. we'll begin with dana. >> i'm curious about how it was that you were plucked out of the crowd, of all the joushallists that were there, how did it come to be that you were chosen, to get a chance to talk to him? i know you worked it a little bit. i would love to hear that story. the second question i have is what is the toughest question that he asked you in those interviews? >> you know, dana, i like the way you put it. i worked it. i did work it, my friend. because what happened was, everybody was being turned away. everybody wanted time with nelson mandela after he first got out. here he is at his home. what happened was i had written a book about the american civil rights movement, "eyes
behind this education revolution that is happening. also baby seat that has some parents outraged. why they say it is just going too far. >> california man on mission. just how long he plans on ringing that bell. you know it's hard to believe an amazing effort he makes. i'll have the [son] all right,she has no idea. [man] no one told her,right? [son]hi! [mom screams] your season is here. let's just call it the baking time of year. you need special ingredients. you need the staples for homemade. you need safeway sugar for just a buck eighty-eight. and that magic thing that makes everyone want another only two ninety-nine for challenge butter. and when hands get messy, quite surely they'll say, yum! wow! yay! what a sweeter holiday. safeway. ingredients for life. >> most of us had to adapt to the internet but all young people have ever known. so schools are now race to go make children education as modern and connected as the rest of their lives. away from the classroom. and this week that effort got a very big pwingt from 2 of the most influential names in tech. here's jonathan bl
their families. it's not easy for roma children in the czech education system. according to much in every below but it's not just because their parents don't always look after them properly. it all she tells me the state must do more to promote integration. rachel tells me that recently check education authorities ask them to count the roma children. it's the will that mean it. if it down yet they want us to judge which children were roma and which were not on the basis of their physical appearance. why did you react and haven't heard anything since then. education authorities put the scheme on ice because of the criticism it received from many teachers. one year ago police said was to not go up and started the pilot project roma like elena by nova and carl someone for being trained a special police officers in an attempt to combat rising crime the city's ombudsman for minorities. pablo books of the lake. helped initiate the project. he believes there will be less friction at the crime rate among the roma falls. so what do we knew we wanted to use the hatred all of the roma police officers are
pr and a push to get young folks engaged in the process and education is going to be the key way to solving the low enrollment and lack of enthusiasm around the law. >> not enough pr, that is what we're hearing this morning. i'll let you respond to that. also, as part of the polling, this comes from united technologies congressional connection poll. about -- actually, more than half of these young people, 18 to 29 who were surveyed said, they actually think the law is going to get repealed. whether that's reality or not, it's the perception. if they think that after three-plus years of what most of us would argue there's been pr, how in the world do you convince them at this point to sign up? >> absolutely, shannon. i think what this really shows is millenials are a whole lot smarter than president obama thinks they are. they have looked at the choices and, as this poll shows, they are not really interested. he catapulted to his presidency by taking this group of people for granted and as much as i think young people want to see some sort of health care reform, they are not reall
, the apartheid remains with gaps in poverty and health care and education. we are in the middle of the end of the apartheid story but now it has just changed faces. >> didn't see that coming. using apartheid to describe present day america. in case you noticed i'm not an older black south african, but if i were i would be peeved. but as attention getting stunts go, comparing your cause always works. and part of it is his fault. he's aligned himself with leftist ideas that have done little to raise the votes of his brethren and others who do not embrace such assumptions. jackson shows it is time for a new batch of leaders, rejecting the government bloat that has dragged so many blacks and whites down. our black conservatives and libertarians, and they exist, but you only hear about them when they are mocked by liberals black and white. i used apartheid regarding such leaders but i'm not that dumb. >>> so, bob, you are good friends with jesse jackson. you hung out with him. i remember seeing him with you once. was he wrong to use the word aparthe apartheid. >> well probably in the context th
read so much about, that i had educated others in the california legislature, that that ione to jail for, had rallied on college campuses for, and all of a sudden, when he landed, in los angeles, when we created the big welcome event for him, there he was, and i was dumbstruck. i was in all of him, and, of course, you know, there is no one else like him. >> congresswoman, someone -- the emancipation proclamation took a long time to come to fruition. we move from the civil war into the 1960's. that is our experience. there is a different south african experience. thesimilar or different is black experience in south africa, versus the united states? >> apartheid in south africa was the worst kind of oppression you could ever imagine. not only did you have people who to areas fard outside of the main cities of south africa, who lived in shanties, one water fountain that served thousands and people brown, or white, and if you fell in the black category or the brown category, you simply could not be educated, you simply could not have a decent job. you worked in the mines for pennies. it
of educational opportunity. it expanded during his time in office. how did that translate into job creation and economic growth? >> for the first time, one of the issues with apartheid is that there was an entire generation of young people who skipped any kind of education. they came in and totally changed that system and now you have blacks college-educated since the end of apartheid who have joined the workforce and have become productive members of the economy. it's been a huge leap forward. >> there was criticism of mr. mandela from black south because the change was seismic in the country and they expect it seismic change to mean immediate change but that wasn't the case, was it? >> it's a tough proposition. the unemployment rate in 1992 was 40%. expectation was that this miracle had happened and overnight things would improve. things did improve and have improved but they certainly don't happen overnight. >> how has south africa's economy become a source of growth for its neighbors? >> they're lucky to have abundant natural resources. they have mining, gold, coal, platinum. they have
a wage when they're trying to earn a living. as we have more older and highly educated people in that sector. >> if you had a perfect system in a test tube, though, and it's not that way, it just seems to me, if you can find someone not working that is willing to work at whatever the market price is, you can fill enough jobs that you want, it seems like, you know, if you're true to economics, it seems like you would never set anything. you'd want the market. >> this is an idea that says -- >> and the other thing, jared, is it not this simple? a company can either have 100 people at $8 an hour or 80 people at $10 an hour. >> it's definitely not that simple. let me respond to both of those. i thought it was gary who gave a good list of the way that minimum wages -- the increases tend to get absorbed. and that's why, joe, your second point i think is wrong. he talked about profits, he talked about prices. there's also efficiency gains. clearly, the absorption mechanism isn't just on the employment margin. that's why we get those results i've been describing through our discussion
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
and share ideas on tax reform, on education reform. on getting things done. we love the environment on you can actually achieve results. that's the great thing of being a governor. i look at so many of the members of the utah state legislature who are here. and with each one of them, i can tell you stories about how we were able to get things done and the can-do attitude. it was remarkable. joe then went on to the senate and became terribly frustrated with the culture that existed on capitol hill, something that evan knows a lot about. i went on to china to become our senior diplomat running the embassy there. and we kind of regrouped a little bit later when joe and nancy jacobson, who was the power behind no labels initially came and said would you like to become part of the no labels movement. what on earth is no labels? is it a third party effort to kind of ship wreck the republicans and the democrats. is it a bunch of mushy moderates to get together to take over the world? none of the above. come to find that it is a group that respects the fact that we have a two-party system. they ar
with a special emphasis on the children least likely to get an education in africa, girls, orphans, children living in extreme poverty. the schools for africa initiative has raised more than $164 million and helped more than 21 million children in 11 african countries. the kids in need of desks fund that i created is part of this initiative. the k.i.n.d. fund delivers desks to classrooms around the country has now raised 5 stk $859,920. that was after your contributions flowed in last night and today in the amount of $76,404 after i talked about the k.i.n.d. fund on last night's show and asked you to help. hundreds and thousands of kids in africa are sitting at desk are for the first time in their lives thanks to you and your generosity to the k.i.n.d. fund. they are now providing scholarships to girls in malawi. you can contribute by calling 1-800-4unicef. whenever we deliver desks tole skoo to the schools, kids always thank us in song. . ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] if you're a rinse user, you may have heard there's a new rinse that talks about protecting, even after eating and drinking.
health care and education. modernizing infrastructure. and healing. >> his close relationship with leaders like muammar gaddafi and castro drew criticism, he still visited the white houses meeting with three sitting american properties. in 2002 george w. bush presented him with the presidential medal of freedom. barack obama met nelson mandela in 2005, when barack obama was a senator. after one term as president nelson mandela stepped down. he did not slow his pace. his charitable foundation raised money for a number of causes. >> when south africa hosted the world cup tournament in 2010, he made his last public appearance. the crowd honoured him to thunderous ovation. >> his third wife, graca machel, former first lady of mozambique, was at his side during prostate cancer and lingering lung infections. >> never and never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. and suffer the indignity of being the skunk of the world. the sun never set on so glorious a human achievement. let freedom rain. god bless africa. >> nelson man
for africa initiative in 2004 to promote education in africa with a special emphasis on the children least likely to get an education in africa, girls, orphans and children living in extreme poverty. the schools for africa initiative has raised more than $164 million and helped more than 21 million children in 11 african countries. the kids in need of desks fund that i created with unicef is part of this initiative, the kind fund which provides jobs in ma louy has now raised 5 million $851,920. that was after your contributions throwed in today in the amount of $76,404 after i talked about the kind fund on last night's show and asked to you hip. 0 hundreds of thousands of children are sitting at desks for the first time in their lives thanks to you. the kind fund is now providing desks to girls. call 1-800-4unicef. as you have seen in my previous reports, whether we deliver desks to the schools, the kids always thank us in song. ♪ ♪ more dining out. more traveling. and along with it, more identity theft. every time you pull out your credit card, shop online, or hit the road, you give t
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